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Roy Is Pseudo-Intelligent With Ability To Leave You Dazed With Its Dullness

Some films just leave you dazed. They are plain unveiling of events and nothing more. One such film happens to be Vikramjit Singh’s Roy. This debut film by the filmmaker is although technically sound yet it is intellectually inane.

The film tries to show us the portrait of life and attempts to bring the beauty of “Two Halves” together. Although fiction the film parallels the real and reel life. The story of the film revolves around a filmmaker Kabir Grewal (Arjun Rampal) who finds inspiration for the script of his next film through his real life. He crafts the script as the events in his life unfold. Every character, every twist is captured and rewritten on the canvas of 70mm by this filmmaker. Through this arduous journey of filmmaking we become aware of Kabir’s frivolous indulgences as well as his budding feelings for a fellow filmmaker Ayesha Aamir (Jacqueline Fernandez). The film which on a surface looks to be a heist film turns out to be a love story with no tadka at all!

Although roots in aesthetic thrill, the film is plain. The story of the film takes off in Malaysia and ends in Malaysia. In midst whatever happens is courageously defined by the protagonist in his own words, “Pata nahi ye film kaise bani…” Mind you, that dialogue sure gets audience approval. As being the only dialogue in the film which is closer to reality the audience cannot stop themselves for cheering at the galls of the filmmaker for using it in the film!

The film’s built up isn’t strong, it drags and slurs throughout. The filmmaker attempts to make it look like cinematic genius but only fails terribly. Except the songs nothing appeases you much. You watch the film with a straight face, and with its end slate scrolling, you only heave a heavy sigh of relief. Speaking of the performances, Arjun is often somber even when he is acquainting himself with a starlet or flirting with his colleague. Ranbir is natural but doesn’t fit the bill. Despite being an alter ego to Kabir, Roy’s unglam avatar is something that doesn’t really go well with Ranbir’s personality. Jacqueline is said to have modulated her voice for the double role she plays in the film. Neither her voice nor her acting had any trace of even slightly being modulated by the experience she is gaining from her career.

The film does have an unpredictable storyline and it isn’t paced well. It is slow with a weak story and despite being a love story it has a mysterious aura almost lulling you to sleep. And despite being artistic and aesthetic, with a fine climax the film fails to mollify the viewers. Watch it on your own risk, we give it a 2.

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